A game of Beat the Clock and a kiss goodnight

I wondered silently if I’d remembered to take my Metamucil that morning, and if McDonald’s would do for our graduation dinner.

[As our son, Benn, was graduating kindergarten, my husband and I had no idea that one day he would be an enthusiastic agricultural student at Clemson University, racking up 4.0 averages during his first four semesters. And where did he get his love of farming? (Don’t look at me.) From Arnold Ziffel, of course.]

Green Acres is the Place to Be

As the dog days of summer overtake me, I like to reflect on the pleasant, yet unusual way my summer began – at a kindergarten graduation. Participating in the pomp and circumstance of five- and six-year-olds engaged in their last hurray of innocence is an activity enjoyed mainly by young, enthusiastic parents, and wise, seasoned grandparents. Continue reading “A game of Beat the Clock and a kiss goodnight”

Capturing the essence

Inspired by her dogs, and by the sunlit beaches, rocky coastline and the shady woods of Martha’s Vineyard and New England, she began photographing her “best friends” against this stunning natural backdrop.

The art of Debra Marlin

Leafing through the brittle, yellowed pages of Debra Marlin’s childhood photo album speaks as much to her future as it does her past. On page after page, Debra is seen posing, smiling brightly for the camera, with at least one of her father’s prized German shepherds at her side. Spotting a picture of Debra alone is rare. Continue reading “Capturing the essence”

Nostalgia pervades Folly Beach

A picturesque seaside village steeped in history and its own unusual brand of culture, Folly Beach is affectionately referred to as “The Edge of America.”

[One of Charleston’s popular feature writers, Patra Taylor describes life along the South Carolina coastline.]

Welcome to Folly Beach

Located just eight miles south of historic downtown Charleston, Folly Beach, South Carolina begins at the end of Highway 171 on Folly Island. A picturesque seaside village steeped in history and its own unusual brand of culture, this six-mile long barrier island, bordered by the Folly River and Atlantic Ocean, is affectionately referred to as “The Edge of America.” Continue reading “Nostalgia pervades Folly Beach”

Old becomes new again

Antique heart pine beams reclaimed from an old sugar factory in Honduras were cut, custom stained and used for the floors throughout much of the home.

A Greek-Revival farmhouse

Patra Taylor is one of many talented feature writers who contributes to the quarterly publication. In Old becomes new again, she writes about a beautiful Greek-Revival-style farmhouse located in the heart of her hometown, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. Continue reading “Old becomes new again”

Eliza Lucas Pinckney lives!

“A people who mean to be their own governors,” said Eliza Lucas Pinckney, “must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

[In this item, feature writer, Patra Taylor, introduces the latest trend in Charleston party-going.]

Charleston is abuzz with sightings of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, the first woman to be inducted into the South Carolina Business Hall of Fame. At the age of 16, Pinckney, took over the management of Wappoo Plantation and her family’s other two agricultural properties in 1739. Through her extensive knowledge of botany, she went on to develop indigo as one of South Carolina’s most important cash crops, revolutionizing the colonial economy prior to the Revolutionary War, and forever preserving her place in American history. Continue reading “Eliza Lucas Pinckney lives!”

The wolf, the chocolates and the curse jar, Part 2

After watching “Southern Charm,” I realized that those of us born in the land of Sherman are not alone when it comes to our foul mouths.

[Here’s a bit of senior humor by one of the Charleston Mercury columnists, Patra Taylor.]

Forget the chocolates…

After two months of soulful introspection, I have determined that there are two kinds of cursing: environmental and situational. Figuring this out is a result of resolving to purge myself of the curse of cursing after learning that my fellow-Ohioans are the foulest mouthed folks in the nation. Continue reading “The wolf, the chocolates and the curse jar, Part 2”

Charleston’s Historic Homes

Charleston is the real thing, a city whose people and architecture have survived the ages and prevailed through the best–and worst–of times.

[One of the Lowcountry’s feature writers, Patra Taylor, describes some of the magnificent homes open for tours in the Charleston area.]

In the footsteps of heros

Downtown Homes

To wander the streets of Charleston is to walk in the footsteps of Revolutionary War heroes, signers of the Declaration of Independence and authors of the United States Constitution. Many of the buildings still bear their names; their descendants still live and work here. Charlestonians are quick to point out that while other “Colonial towns” may be replicas, Charleston is the real thing, a city whose people and architecture have survived the ages and prevailed through the best–and worst–of times. Continue reading “Charleston’s Historic Homes”