Rice Told Tales

After a nearly hundred-year absence, rice has made a comeback in South Carolina.

Charleston Food Facts

In the early 1700s, planters near the coastal port of Charleston began the arduous process of clearing and diking inland swamps to provide water for the cultivation of rice. But the first attempts at growing it failed. Finally, in 1726, rice was successfully introduced into the colony, and with its success came the first wave of economic prosperity. In its rice heyday, Charleston Harbor was one of the largest shippers of rice in the world, second only to Bangkok. With the abolition of slavery in 1865, labor-intensive rice production had screeched to a halt by the turn of the century. Continue reading “Rice Told Tales”

From the City of Angels to the Holy City

A self-described representational painter, Ignatov’s works float fluidly between impressionism and realism.

One of Charleston, SC’s feature writers, Patra Taylor, meets artist Ignat Ignatov.

The art of Ignat Ignatov

This article by one of Charleston’s prolific feature writers, Patra Taylor, introduces readers to the art of Bulgarian-born  impressionist, Ignat Ignatov, whose paintings are featured at LePrince Fine Art located on Charleston’s historic King Street. Continue reading “From the City of Angels to the Holy City”

Coots, codgers and a kick in the shin

While I still appreciate the simplicity of the “sticks and stones” problem-solving paradigm, I prefer to think I’ve evolved with the times. Today, bullies are dealt with through zero tolerance policies, the arduous criminal justice system and lengthy civil lawsuits.

At the risk of sounding antediluvian, the playground protocol from the era I grew up in seemed a whole lot simpler than it is today. When confronted with taunting and name-calling, a girl like me would first initiate the “sticks and stones” defense.

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” Continue reading “Coots, codgers and a kick in the shin”

Charleston Caters to Golf Travelers

First came Tom Fazio, who designed an oceanfront gem along a pristine stretch of Isle of Palms dunes, and suddenly the Charleston area was at the center of golf’s spotlight.

From amateur to pro…

Photo of a golf hole.While Myrtle Beach to the north and Hilton Head to south were developing into two of the best-known destinations in golf, the old port city of Charleston was initially content attracting scads of visitors to its broad beaches, boutique shops, historic sites, fine dining restaurants, and harbor and garden tours. But eventually, the city known as “the birthplace of golf in America” decided to get in on the roaring success experienced by its coastal neighbors and plunged into the golf world with both feet. Continue reading “Charleston Caters to Golf Travelers”

Howling dogs make for sweet summer dreams

All these years later, I’m still a dreamer. I believe our dreams are who we really are. Every one of us is a little bit rock star, a little bit astronaut, and a little bit Stanley Cup winner.

[This appeared in the July 8, 2004 edition of the Charleston Mercury.]

These boots were made for walking

I was almost a ‘60s sensation.

In the summer of ’66, I decided to form an all-girl rock band, a cutting edge idea at the time, especially for a girl of 10.  I figured a generation that welcomed the Beatles, the Animals and the Rolling Stones would also be receptive to a group of pre-pubescent, relatively talent-less rockers of another sort. I was clearly ahead of my time. Continue reading “Howling dogs make for sweet summer dreams”

Saving Trinity

Mike quickly discovered the door was open and the church was welcoming, so he found himself inside, marveling at the church’s sophisticated architectural and pondering the original intent of those who built it in Abbeville on the eve of the American Civil War.

Sacred Spaces

Saving Trinity is the fourth in a series by Patra Taylor about Preservation South Carolina’s efforts to save the state’s rural Sacred Spaces. This article appeared in the June 2019 issue of the Charleston Mercury.

Excerpt from article: Each time Bedenbaugh turns the lock in the door, he bears the responsibility of representing the passions and integrity of the board of directors of Preservation South Carolina for which he serves as executive director. More importantly, he has made promises to the church’s congregants, to the community, to the Episcopal diocese. Saving this church edifice for future generations is personal. To Mike, they’re all personal. Continue reading “Saving Trinity”

The Divided States of America

Just avoid talk of religion, politics or money with our friends and family at our Fourth of July gathering, and all will be well? Not anymore. It seems there is little we can talk about with each other that won’t result in at least a war of words, and at most, a brawl.

[Op ed columnists have long been among the most admired writers to Patra Taylor. In January 2019, she decided to jump into the churning waters of opinion writing with her own iteration she calls RAWW, Rants of an Angry White Woman…quite a transformation from the humor she specialized in for a decade and a half.]

One nation under God…not anymore

The Divided States of America appeared in the June 2019 issue of the Photo of couple arguing.Charleston Mercury. Continue reading “The Divided States of America”