Rice Told Tales

After a nearly hundred-year absence, rice has made a comeback in South Carolina.

Charleston Food Facts

In the early 1700s, planters near the coastal port of Charleston began the arduous process of clearing and diking inland swamps to provide water for the cultivation of rice. But the first attempts at growing it failed. Finally, in 1726, rice was successfully introduced into the colony, and with its success came the first wave of economic prosperity. In its rice heyday, Charleston Harbor was one of the largest shippers of rice in the world, second only to Bangkok. With the abolition of slavery in 1865, labor-intensive rice production had screeched to a halt by the turn of the century. Continue reading “Rice Told Tales”

Old becomes new again

Antique heart pine beams reclaimed from an old sugar factory in Honduras were cut, custom stained and used for the floors throughout much of the home.

A Greek-Revival farmhouse

Patra Taylor is one of many talented feature writers who contributes to the quarterly publication. In Old becomes new again, she writes about a beautiful Greek-Revival-style farmhouse located in the heart of her hometown, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. Continue reading “Old becomes new again”