Capturing the essence

Inspired by her dogs, and by the sunlit beaches, rocky coastline and the shady woods of Martha’s Vineyard and New England, she began photographing her “best friends” against this stunning natural backdrop.

The Art of Debra Marlin

Leafing through the brittle, yellowed pages of Debra Marlin’s childhood photo album speaks as much to her future as it does her past. On page after page, Debra is seen posing, smiling brightly for the camera, with at least one of her father’s prized German shepherds at her side. Spotting a picture of Debra alone is rare. Continue reading “Capturing the essence”

Nostalgia pervades Folly Beach

A picturesque seaside village steeped in history and its own unusual brand of culture, Folly Beach is affectionately referred to as “The Edge of America.”

[One of Charleston’s popular feature writers, Patra Taylor describes life along the South Carolina coastline.]

Welcome to Folly Beach

Located just eight miles south of historic downtown Charleston, Folly Beach, South Carolina begins at the end of Highway 171 on Folly Island. A picturesque seaside village steeped in history and its own unusual brand of culture, this six-mile long barrier island, bordered by the Folly River and Atlantic Ocean, is affectionately referred to as “The Edge of America.” Continue reading “Nostalgia pervades Folly Beach”

Eliza Lucas Pinckney lives!

“A people who mean to be their own governors,” said Eliza Lucas Pinckney, “must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

[In this item, feature writer, Patra Taylor, introduces the latest trend in Charleston party-going.]

Charleston is abuzz with sightings of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, the first woman to be inducted into the South Carolina Business Hall of Fame. At the age of 16, Pinckney, took over the management of Wappoo Plantation and her family’s other two agricultural properties in 1739. Through her extensive knowledge of botany, she went on to develop indigo as one of South Carolina’s most important cash crops, revolutionizing the colonial economy prior to the Revolutionary War, and forever preserving her place in American history. Continue reading “Eliza Lucas Pinckney lives!”

Charleston’s Historic Homes

Charleston is the real thing, a city whose people and architecture have survived the ages and prevailed through the best–and worst–of times.

[One of the Lowcountry’s feature writers, Patra Taylor, describes some of the magnificent homes open for tours in the Charleston area.]

In the footsteps of heros

Downtown Homes

To wander the streets of Charleston is to walk in the footsteps of Revolutionary War heroes, signers of the Declaration of Independence and authors of the United States Constitution. Many of the buildings still bear their names; their descendants still live and work here. Charlestonians are quick to point out that while other “Colonial towns” may be replicas, Charleston is the real thing, a city whose people and architecture have survived the ages and prevailed through the best–and worst–of times. Continue reading “Charleston’s Historic Homes”

Meet Amy Heath

Heath’s diligence, along with her willingness to do whatever it takes to make filming a pleasure in her city has resulted in an impressive list of productions.

Read About Amy Heath

The Southeast Film Guide is a resource guide featuring articles, location information, bios and support services specifically written for film industry professionals. In the article, Meet Amy Heath by one of the area’s feature writers, Patra Taylor, readers learn how North Charleston’s film industry advocate. Heath promotes North Charleston as a great place to live and work, a great place to visit, and a great place to film movies and television series. Continue reading “Meet Amy Heath”

Relaxation Reimagined

With a focus on every detail, this unique spa is legendary for its ability to sooth the body, mind and spirit.

Read About the Dewberry Spa

This article by one of South Carolina’s prolific feature writers, Patra Taylor, who introduces readers to the luxurious Dewberry Spa, tucked inside the Dewberry Charleston, a beleaguered federal building turned destination hotel. And what’s a destination hotel without a spa? But as you’ll read, the Dewberry isn’t just any spa…it’s a spa worth traveling halfway around the world to visit.

About Charleston Style & Design

Charleston Style & Design is a quarterly magazine for the discriminating reader who has a zest for living and is eager to discover new horizons in Charleston and the Lowcountry. It is the premiere design publication in the Charleston area. Quentin Senise is the publication’s publisher, and Debra Kronowitz is the editor. Patra Taylor is one of many talented feature writers who regularly contribute to the quarterly publication.

Quote from article: “Once clients step beyond the reception area, they are enveloped in a fresh, subtle fragrance that comes from the cypress-paneled walls. This distinctive scent mingles with the gentle sound of water flowing from a fountain. Here, clients begin their personal journeys from the stress of daily life to complete euphoria. With a focus on every detail, this unique spa is legendary for its ability to sooth the body, mind and spirit.”

 

Artist Manning Williams : Inspiring Charleston’s Neo-Renaissance

Despite his numerous commissions, Williams’ role inspiring a new generation of artists may one day be considered his most significant contribution to the Charleston art community.

One of Charleston, SC’s feature writers, Patra Taylor, remembers artist Manning Williams.

Meet an Artist’s Artist, Manning Williams

At the turn of the 20th century, Charleston languished as an old Southern town that time had forgotten. Devastated by the Civil War, Charleston’s rich heritage hung over the city like a faded dream. But in 1920, an amazing collaboration of artists and writers spearheaded a dramatic cultural revival that would last 25 years and help Charleston reclaim its title as one of the most significant art and cultural centers in America. Continue reading “Artist Manning Williams : Inspiring Charleston’s Neo-Renaissance”